It can be hard to know where to turn for reliable information about diagnosing and treating common foot and ankle problems. You can trust our podiatrists to provide the most up-to-date information available when answering Frequently Asked Questions. If the answers you need are not here, please give us a call.

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  • What is the difference between a corn and a callus?

    Corns and calluses can develop for a variety of reasons, including friction between the foot and shoe, rubbing, irritation, or continual pressure against the skin. Both corns and calluses can be annoying and bothersome, but they develop to protect your skin, and both of these skin conditions are treatable and preventable. It’s important to know the difference between the two, so they can be treated properly. The difference between corns and calluses

    The Difference Between Corns and Calluses

    Both corns and calluses are formed by layers of hard, thick skin that build up on your toes and feet. They can also develop on your hands and other parts of the body. Corns are round and small and usually found on the top or sides of your toes. Calluses, however, tend to be thicker and harder patches on the skin. These are usually found on the bottom of your foot or where most of your weight is carried—on your heel, big toe, or the ball of the foot.

    Types of Corns

    There are few different types of corns:

    • Hard corns. These are small, hard, and dense on thickened areas of the skin. They tend to form on the top of the toes where bone pressure is against the skin.
    • Soft corns. These are usually white or gray in color and have almost a rubbery texture. These develop between the toes.
    • Seed corns: These are small and round corns that form on the bottom of the feet.

    Calluses

    It is actually common to have a fair amount of callus on the bottom of your foot. Calluses are irregular in shape and very rough and patchy to the touch. They form as a way for your body to protect the inner layers of skin from irritation and injury.

    Who Gets Corns and Calluses?

    Athletes tend to develop calluses because they engage in a high level of activity, and greater demand is placed on their feet. Calluses can also develop on the hands and fingers. Gymnasts, guitarists, tennis players, construction workers, or any person in a profession/activity that uses repetitive motion and pressure will likely have calluses on their hands. In contrast, corns are more likely to be caused by ill-fitting shoes or a side effect of an illness.

    You are more likely to experience corns and calluses when:

    • You have a pre-existing medical condition that causes the bone of your feet to be out of alignment. Some examples of this would be arthritis, bunions, or bone spurs.
    • You often walk around without socks.
    • You wear shoes that are too tight or narrow.
    • You are a smoker.

    Causes of Corns and Calluses

    Even though corns and calluses appear on different parts of the foot and sometimes look dissimilar, they are actually caused by many of the same factors. These include:

    • Wearing shoes that don’t fit well. Ill-fitting shoes can cause problems for your feet. If shoes are too tight, they rub against the skin and cause irritation. Women who wear high heels are also at risk of developing calluses due to the downward pressure while walking.
    • Standing, walking or running. If you stand on your feet for a long period of time each day, are a marathon runner, or walk/hike frequently, you’re likely to develop corns or calluses.
    • Walking barefoot frequently. With nothing to protect your feet from pavement, grass, and a variety of other surfaces, your feet are more likely to develop calluses to protect themselves.
    • Having structural foot deformities. If you have hammertoes, tailor’s bunions, or birth deformities, it’s likely that corns will develop.

    Living with Corns and Calluses

    Corns and calluses are not painful when they first appear but can quickly become uncomfortable and irritating. Calluses are less sensitive but sometimes crack. These cracks are called fissures and can begin to hurt. Corns are usually tender to the touch and noticeably uncomfortable sooner.

    If corns and calluses are left untreated, they will likely increase in size and have a higher risk of becoming infected. The bigger they get, the more they will affect everyday life and will need proper treatment.

    How to Diagnose and Treat Corns and Calluses

    A visual inspection of the foot is usually sufficient to diagnose a corn or callus, and this can be done with a simple visit to the podiatrist. A podiatrist can also help you find treatment and solutions. Some examples of treatment may include:

    • Soaking the corn or callus in warm water
    • Using a pumice stone to remove the corn or callus
    • Applying a moisturizer that will soften the skin

    Are You Looking for a Foot Care Specialist in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for foot care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

     

  • When should I see a podiatrist about toenail fungus?

    See a podiatrist for toenail fungus.Toenail fungus often looks unsightly before it feels bothersome, which leads many people to simply ignore it and wait to seek treatment. Unfortunately, toenail fungus can actually lead to more serious issues, which is why it’s important to know when to pay attention and see a podiatrist. 

    Signs of Toenail Fungus 

    Toenail fungus, more formally known as onychomycosis, is an infection under the nailbed caused by a fungus. The most noticeable signs are a foul odor and the toenail darkening in color. Other signs include: 

    • White marks on the nail plate 
    • Thickened nails that are difficult to trim 
    • Brittle or “crumbling” nails 
    • Change in nailbed shape 
    • Pain when walking with shoes on 
    • A secondary bacterial or yeast infection in or around the nail 

    Causes of Toenail Fungus 

    Our feet come into contact with so many microorganisms, including fungi. Your toenails are especially susceptible around damp areas where you’re likely to be barefoot, including pools, showers, lakes, rivers, and locker rooms. Fungus working its way under the nailbed in these conditions is a common cause of toenail fungus issues. 

    Injured toenails are another cause of toenail fungus. If your nail bed is injured, whether you stub your toe or have too much pressure against the nails from shoes, it can lead to an infection. 

    Finally, those who suffer from chronic diseases are more susceptible to toenail fungus. This includes diabetics, immunocompromised individuals, and those with poor circulation. All of these illnesses make the feet more prone to fungal infections. 

    Treating a Fungal Infection at Home 

    Sometimes, it’s possible to treat a fungal infection at home, although it can take a very long while and isn’t always effective. If you wish to try, you will need to follow a cleansing routine daily for many months in order to suppress the infection. Some cosmetic issues related to toenail fungus can be resolved through filing off white markings and applying an over-the-counter antifungal medicine. 

    When to See a Podiatrist 

    Even with the best efforts at home-based remedies, a time might come when you need to seek professional help. Going to a general practitioner can be helpful, but contacting a podiatrist directly will expedite the treatment and healing process. 

    You should visit a podiatrist when you notice any of the above-mentioned symptoms of a fungal infection. Again, these include discoloration, thickening, or deformities. The sooner you seek treatment, the easier it will be to clear up the fungal infection, so don’t ignore the signs of trouble even if they aren’t causing you significant distress. 

    It’s especially important to make an appointment with a podiatrist if: 

    • You aren’t sure what’s wrong. If you have never been diagnosed with foot fungus by a podiatrist before, you might be self-diagnosing incorrectly. There are many different conditions that can mimic nail fungus, so what seems basic might actually be a more complicated, or even dangerous, issue. The best way to determine what’s truly going on is to speak with a professional. 
    • You are diabetic. Diabetes has many physical side effects and ailments, including toenail fungus that can get infected and is quite serious. Since diabetes can be so destructive, working closely with a podiatrist is always a good idea. Diabetics tend to get infections more easily than healthy people due to their poor blood circulation. 
    • At-home treatments aren’t working. If you’ve tried over-the-counter creams and soaks and are still seeing or feeling abnormalities, it is time to take things to the next level with a doctor who can provide something stronger. 

    A podiatrist can treat a fungal infection with a few different methods, depending upon the severity of the infection. First, an oral medication might be prescribed. Unfortunately many have side effects, including (although rare) permanent damage to the liver. 

    Laser treatment is another option and is sometimes very effective. Before scheduling a laser treatment, ensure it is covered by your insurance, as anything involving lasers can quickly get very expensive. 

    If the toenail is very infected or the infections are occurring regularly, a podiatrist might opt to remove the toenail. While this is never an ideal option, it will permanently resolve the issue. 

    Are You Looking for a Toenail Fungus Specialist in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for toenail fungus care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

     

  • Why do people with diabetes get dry skin?

    Diabetics need to moisturize to prevent skin. People with diabetes are more susceptible to infections, even when they are rooted in something that seems as minor as dry skin. 

    Symptoms of Dry Skin 

    While everyone gets dry skin from time to time, a chronic more serious issue might include: 

    Causes of Dry Skin

    While dry skin can be a year-round issue, it can be exacerbated during cold weather months. In the winter, moisture disappears due to cold, dry air and heaters or fires in homes. Both healthy people and those with diabetes will notice an increase in itchy hands and chapped lips.

    Hyperglycemia—the elevated blood sugar associated with uncontrolled diabetes—can cause dry skin throughout the year. The imbalance in body chemistry causes the skin to react severely. If your blood glucose is too high, your body quickly loses fluid. This in turn will dry out your skin. 

    Neuropathy can also contribute to issues with dry skin for people with diabetes. When your diabetes is uncontrolled for too long, it can cause nerve damage. If you have damaged nerves in the lower extremities, they won’t receive the message from your brain to sweat. Since sweat is what keeps skin moisturized, dry skin can easily occur. 

    Potential Dangers

    Dry skin is not a small matter for people with diabetes. It can become red and sore, and if left untreated can crack. Cracks can also occur from scratching if the skin becomes itchy and irritated. Germs then enter through these skin cracks and can cause an infection. 

    Again, due to a loss of sensation in the limbs, some diabetics won’t even notice there is an issue until an infection has occurred and medical help is needed. Blood glucose promotes a breeding ground for bacteria, and it causes the body to not be able to heal itself as effectively. 

    It’s important to do regular checks of your hands, feet, legs, and arms to look for dry skin and treat it immediately. 

    How to Prevent Dry Skin 

    Since the feet are usually most affected due to their constant use and pressure placed upon them, using a high-quality moisturizing cream can help prevent damage and infection. A podiatrist can prescribe an effective moisturizer that is safe for people with diabetes. 

    Other steps to take include:

    • Wash your feet in warm (not hot) water every day, using mild cleansers that won’t dry out or irritate the skin. Avoid soaking in hot water, which can be especially drying. 
    • Protect your skin from the weather with breathable clothing with good coverage and appropriate footwear. 
    • Keep your blood sugar in check. Choose a healthy diet, exercise regularly, and meet regularly with your medical team to keep things on track. 

    When to See a Podiatrist 

    Any cracks in your skin are a sign it’s time to go see a podiatrist. Blood sugar acts as “food” for an infection, and it can make it much more difficult to heal. 

    You should also see a podiatrist when: 

    • You see signs of infection or irritation. 
    • You are experiencing discomfort.
    • You are overweight. (Obesity contributes to dry skin due to the extra pressure it puts on the feet.) 

    It’s a good idea to see a podiatrist regularly for foot checks even if you don’t suspect an issue. It can be difficult to see every portion of the skin, especially if illness or obesity is an issue. A podiatrist can examine you thoroughly every few months and ensure you are doing everything you can to prevent severe skin issues that can start with something as simple as dry feet. 

    Are You Looking For Diabetic Foot Care in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for diabetic foot care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

  • What are the signs and symptoms of a foot or ankle stress fracture?

    Get help for a stress fracture.A stress fracture can be very painful and inconvenient for an active person. It is defined as a small crack in the bone, and sometimes severe bone bruising. If they go unchecked, stress fractures can lead to further injury, so it’s important to know the symptoms and the causes in order to protect your feet from further damage. 

    The Causes of Stress Fractures

    Usually caused by overuse or repetitive activity, stress fractures are very common in athletes—especially runners or those participating in running sports like soccer. Even people with very healthy bones can experience a fracture when they partake in frequent and repetitive movements. This is why athletes, who practice skills and drills regularly, are most at risk. Most high-impact sports are at risk for stress fractures due to the intense practice schedule and the constant need to push the body that much further for competitive reasons. 

    On the other side of the coin, those with very weak bones can experience stress fractures. This includes those with osteoporosis and other reasons for bone fragility. If a bone does not have enough density to uphold during normal daily impact, a fracture can occur. 

    Shoes can also be a stress fracture culprit. Whether it’s high heels or old, ill-fitting shoes, various types of footwear can put you at risk of injury. Those with foot deformities can also experience a stress fracture, including those with severe bunions. 

    Any bone in the foot or ankle can be affected by a stress fracture, including: 

    • The metatarsals (connectors of toes to the foot) 
    • The calcaneus (heel bone) 
    • The navicular (near the ankle) 
    • Any bone that makes up the ankle joint including the tibia and fibula

    The Symptoms of a Stress Fracture 

    There are telltale signs of a stress fracture that will help you know if you have one. Of course, the most obvious one is persistent pain. Other symptoms include: 

    • The pain subsides when the foot is rested. 
    • Pain that increases during normal, non-stressful activities. 
    • There is obvious swelling on the top of the foot or outside of the ankle.
    • The fracture site is tender to the touch.
    • There is visible bruising. 

    A stress fracture will almost always cause pain at a very specific location whenever pressure is placed on it. 

    Diagnosing a Stress Fracture 

    There are a few different ways to diagnose a stress fracture. First is a physical examination. It is very important that you see a doctor if you even suspect you have a stress fracture, as ignoring it can lead to the bone breaking completely. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history and your regular activities. They may also ask you about medications and diet. The doctor will then examine your foot looking specifically for points of pain and applying pressure to them. Pain response is the most common way to diagnose a stress fracture. 

    Your doctor might also confirm the diagnosis through imaging such as X-rays. While it can be helpful to get imaging done, it is not a good diagnostic on its own since tiny cracks can be difficult to see via X-ray. If in fact the crack cannot be seen, your doctor might order an MRI. 

    Stress Fracture Treatment 

    There are a few different ways to treat a stress fracture, including both surgical and nonsurgical measures. The easiest ways to heal a stress fracture include: 

    • Medication. Anti-inflammatory medications can help with the pain. 
    • Crutches. Crutches keep the weight off the injury and can help with both healing and pain management. 
    • Modified activity. For approximately six to eight weeks, you may need to prevent any physical activity that causes you pain or places further stress on the injured area. 
    • Protective footwear. Your doctor might suggest sturdy footwear to help prevent further injury during your healing process. Brace shoes are available through a podiatrist. 
    • Cast. While not always appropriate for a stress fracture, some cases do warrant the doctor to apply a cast to keep your bones in a fixed position. This is usually the treatment when the bones on the outer side of the foot are injured. 

    Surgical treatment is sometimes needed if a stress fracture is severe or you are unable to keep weight off of it for whatever reason. Surgery usually involves supporting bones through an inserted fastener. Also known as internal fixation, pins, plates, and/or screws are placed into the foot to hold it together while it heals. 

    Are You Looking for a Stress Fracture Expert in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for stress fracture care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

     

  • Why should I see a podiatrist for my diabetic foot care if I’m not in any pain?

    Diabetics should see a podiatrist even if they have no foot pain.Proper foot care is important for everyone, but it is especially important for diabetics. Due to circulation issues, diabetic feet tend to be more susceptible to injury—and often those injuries can go undetected. For this reason, it’s a good idea for these individuals to have a consistent relationship with a podiatrist regardless of whether or not they are experiencing pain. 

    Nerve Damage in Diabetes 

    It seems only natural to go to the doctor when you’re experiencing pain. Many of us would not consider going to a specialist like a podiatrist until we are dealing with significant pain or injury. Unfortunately for diabetics, nerve damage is one of the common side effects of their condition—and this can make proper treatment of injuries difficult. 

    This nerve damage is called neuropathy, and its most common symptom is numbness. It is considered to be one of the more frequent complications of living with long-term diabetes, and it’s caused by poor blood sugar control over an extended period of time. While all of our nerves can be affected by high sugars, the longest nerves—the ones that extend from spine to toe—tend to be the most impacted. This is why you will experience neuropathy in your feet and legs before your hands or arms. 

    The Risk of Neuropathy Injury 

    Our feet take a beating. Between walking, exercising, and potentially ill-fitting footwear, our feet endure more hits and strains than any other part of our body. In a healthy individual, a cut or blister on the foot isn’t usually a big deal, but it can turn into a severe issue for a person with neuropathy. 

    Diabetic neuropathy causes numbness, which in turn can lead to obliviousness to injury. Without pain, we aren’t alerted to anything being wrong. But diabetes can cause quickly cause a lot of issues. Poorly controlled blood sugar can lead to dried-out skin, which in turn causes calluses or even ulcers on your feet. Combine this with the numbing lack of circulation and you just might find yourself walking around on an injury you don’t even know you have. Since the numbness prevents you from being aware of an issue, this can allow a minor injury to turn into a more serious infection. 

    Proper Prevention 

    Daily self-care is essential to make sure your diabetes stays in check and injuries are avoided. Follow all maintenance plans followed by your doctor, including proper diet and timed insulin. Then, work a self-examination of your feet into your daily routine. 

    In the morning, before bedtime, and also anytime you take your shoes off, take a few moments to look over your feet. Check for any signs of strain—chafing, blistering, cuts, or bruises. You might want to use a mirror to help you check the areas that are hard to see. 

    If you notice any irregularities, write down what you see and the date you noticed it. Some find it helpful to also take a photo. Practice at-home treatment and spend as much time off your feet as you can. Pay close attention to the irregularity and observe it for any changes or progressions in the coming days. 

    Finally, know when it’s time to see a podiatrist. As a general rule, you should make an appointment if you’re experiencing any of the following: 

    • Pain in your legs or thighs, even if you don’t have sensation in your feet 
    • A change in foot shape 
    • Severely dry or cracked skin on your feet
    • Any change in skin color or temperature to the touch 
    • Thickened or yellowing toenails 
    • Blisters, sores, ulcers, corns, or ingrown toenails 
    • Any evidence of a fungal infection like athlete’s foot

    It’s also a great idea to visit a podiatrist several times a year even if you do not experience any issues. The professionals at Austin Foot and Ankle Specialists are able to provide thorough foot examinations and preventative measures that can help a diabetic avoid severe injury. 

    Are You Looking For Diabetic Foot Care in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for diabetic foot care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

     

     

  • Can wearing a motion control running shoe take the place of an orthotic?

    In a small percentage of the population who has a rather stable foot structure, a good motion control running shoe can reduce the tendency to pronate or collapse the arch during activity and as a result, experience relief from some mild symptoms in their feet, knees, or even backs.  But factually speaking, very few people who suffer from any significant structural problems or who have any significant pathology can go without an orthotic in combination with a good motion control running shoe. 

    We highly recommend that our patients get a good, solid and well constructed motion control shoe or sneaker when we dispense their orthotics.  The orthotic and shoe work together to provide maximum stability and corrective position which allows and encourages optimal and non-pathologic function of the foot and ankle during activity. 

    Lastly, the "supportive insoles, arch supports or arch cookies" that are promoted to be in these types of shoes and sneakers are obviously generically placed into the shoe or sneaker which simply does not support every individual's arch or foot structure the same way.  This can be an issue for many people.  Any significant degree of asymmetry or difference in foot structure from one foot to the other generally necessitates a custom-made orthotic that will fit and work in conjunction with a well supportive shoe or sneaker.

    Are You Considering Custom Orthotics  in Austin, TX?

    If you are considering custom orthotics, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

  • Do I need orthotics in my cycling shoes?

    Yes. Especially if you are competitive or do extensive mileage each week.  Experience has shown us that when the orthotics place the bones of the foot in a more corrected and structurally aligned position, this necessitates less energy expenditure by the muscles of the foot and leg as the bones of the foot lock together and in essence, stay aligned during the thousands of "up and down pistoning motions" while cycling. 

    Conversely, when the foot is not in its ideal structural position, it necessitates the muscles of the foot and lower leg to work harder to keep nudging the bones of the foot back into their ideal alignment.  This done over and over during the hours and thousands of downstrokes of the cycling action, causes the muscles to work much harder and predisposes them and even the bones of the foot to injury from overuse.  

    Almost one for one, the cyclists who use these types of orthotics in their cycling shoes have relayed they go faster and longer using less energy and experiencing significantly less "fatigue" during cycling.  Depending on the style of cycle shoe, you may necessitate a pair specifically for that activity but for the most part, the orthotics that you can put into your sneakers or lace-up dress shoes fit into cycling shoes. 

    Are You Considering Custom Orthotics  in Austin, TX?

    If you are considering custom orthotics, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

  • How does laser treatment for toenail fungus work?

    Laser treatment for toenail fungus gets to the root of the problem—fast! In fifteen minutes, you’ll enjoy the benefits of fungus-killing focused light that will bring healing to your unsightly nails. Creams, lacquers, and oral treatments are hit and miss. They may or may not reach the source of your crumbling, yellowing nails. In fact, topical nail applications simply can’t get to the hard-to-reach nail bed.

    Enjoy safe, pain-free treatment for your fungal toenails with Blue Shine Laser Therapy. This laser uses light to reach the source of your infection. In as few as 6-9 months, you can expect a new, healthy nail in place of the old, infected one—now that’s a solution that works.

    If toenail fungus has you hiding your feet, it’s time to take action. Call Austin Foot and Ankle Specialists at (512) 328-8900 or complete our contact form today to learn more about laser treatment for toenail fungus. Dr. Craig H. Thomajan DPM, FACFAS looks forward to helping you end the embarrassment of fungal nails.

    Are You Looking for a Foot Care Doctor in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for foot care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

  • How Do You Treat Post-Static Dyskinesia?

    We treat post-static dyskinesia (meaning impaired movement after being at rest) in various ways, once we have determined what is causing your discomfort. Early morning heel pain when you first step out of bed is most often due to plantar fasciitis—inflammation of or damage to the ligament under your arch.

    RICE therapy (rest, icing, compression, elevation) can help bring down swelling and soreness, and stretching exercises can help recondition the ligament and reduce the damage to the heel from the ligament pulling on it too tightly. For persistent pain, we can try injection therapy using medication, extracorporeal shockwave therapy using energy waves, or cryotherapy using low temperatures. Once the pain has subsided, we will evaluate the biomechanical issues causing your plantar fasciitis and design custom orthotics to correct them.

    Are You Looking for a Plantar Fasciitis Specialist in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for plantar fasciitis care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

  • How long do ankle fractures take to heal?

    Ankle fracture recovery time depends on your individual health and the seriousness of your injury. A simple fracture where the bones stay aligned will heal more quickly than a complex one that requires surgery. In general, you can expect six or more weeks to recover. Even after that, you may need to take it easy for a time. The doctors will check your healing progress by taking regular X-rays and using them to determine when it is safe for you to return to your activities.

    Are You Looking for a Stress Fracture Expert in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for stress fracture care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

  • How often will my child need new orthotics?

    As a general rule, for children under the age of 16 years, every year or every whole shoe size change as in foot growing from a size four to a size five.  After age 16, general rule is about once every two years.   From age 20, it changes to about once every three to five years which is of course only necessary if there are still issues of instability or pain.  With that being said, if the child's bone structure and or mechanics and instability are positively affected by the orthotics to the degree of becoming stable, the orthotics are only needed if the child/young adult is more comfortable wearing them than not.

    Are You Looking for Pediatric Foot Care in Austin, TX?

    If you are looking for pediatric foot care, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.

  • Is a hard or soft orthotic better?

    The answer to this frequently asked question is in fact neither.  This is to say that neither a "hard" or "soft" orthotic is better or in fact ideal.  An orthotic, when properly made, should be hard enough to gently support and realign the bones of your foot yet be soft enough to compress slightly during activity to allow your foot to function properly.  Your foot is dynamic - it is not rigid or static in nature.  Therefore, the best performing orthotic is one that is dynamic because it both supports and flexes in a controlled manor during activity.  The Total Contact Orthotics your doctor uses does just that.

    Are You Considering Custom Orthotics  in Austin, TX?

    If you are considering custom orthotics, you should reach out to an experienced podiatristAustin Foot and Ankle Specialists can help. Our office provides a wide variety of advanced, effective treatment options for all kinds of painful conditions. Ready to schedule an appointment? Contact us online or call our Austin office at 512.328.8900.